Get to your local Chiropodist for a checkup today!

Two of the most important parts of our body are our feet. We need them to stand on, walk with and hold up the rest of our body. So shouldn’t we be taking extra good care of them?

This is why visiting the local chiropodist for a checkup is a great idea. There are many different types of sores, bruises and breaks that could develop into something much more serious if not treated. There is everything from painful calluses, pressure sores, and ulcers as a result of diabetes, corns and other problems like plantar fasciitis, high arches and leg length differences. These are all painful conditions that can affect your posture and the way that you walk.

Look no further than the Chiropodists in Cambridge. They are here to help with all of your foot needs. One of their main services is Custom made orthopaedic shoes. There are many painful foot conditions out there and they are different for each person. This is why the Orthotics clinic and its chiropodists want to help by creating shoes specifically to fit the pain or condition that each foot might have.

There are plenty of ailments that can affect the way your foot may fit into a shoe. They range from general foot pain, sports injuries and shin splints to ingrown toe nails and diabetic foot care. These are all reasons to come in and have your feet checked by the local chiropodists. This way you’ll know what you’re dealing with and how best to heal the ailment and get into a custom pair of orthopaedic shoes.

It’s very easy to ignore a pain in the foot area. Most assume that if you don’t see it then eventually it will go away. The truth is that it will only get worse. You don’t want to let something go and have it turn into something like arthritis or a sore that gets infected. Take the time and come see the local Chiropodist in Cambridge today and give your feet the custom shoes they need. Your feet will thank you.

MedX laser therapy and how it can help with plantar fasciitis, metatarsalgia, arthritis and wounds

For the longest time there was a new foot treatment coming out every decade or so and it only improved the previous treatment a bit more. Finally though, we can now say there is a foot treatment that has improved exponentially in MedX laser therapy. It is now possible to relieve pain and inflammation in the foot related to plantar fasciitis, metatarsalgia, arthritis, heel pain, arch pain and other foot pain without taking anti-inflammatory medication.

The MedX laser therapy treatment has a transformative effect on improving the care of the patient. Through recent studies by NASA researchers it has been found that human tissues repair themselves up to 40% faster with laser phototherapy. The light energy from the laser is absorbed by the various tissues in the body and transferred into biochemical energy. This causes a decrease in swelling, acceleration in healing time and an increase in the overall pain threshold due to the body’s release of endorphins. The laser treatment is extremely safe and has been proven to be very effective in treating muscle strains, plantar fasciitis, metatarsalgia, and arthritis to name a few.

The benefits of MedX laser therapy are:

  • Fast, safe and very effective
  • Low-intensity light energy
  • Decreases healing time and inflammation
  • Improves circulation
  • Excellent results when it comes to Osteoarthritis, Tendonitis, Muscle strains, Ligament Sprains and Repetitive strain injuries

Laser therapy has come a long way and it is now much easier to get treatment and help your pain go away. It’s less painful and a much easier healing process.

MedX Laser Therapy is a featured treatment option at Ontario Foot & Orthotics. For more information, or to book an assessment, contact us at one of our two locations: 519-623-3000 (Cambridge), 905-878-6479 (Milton). Or visit us at

Why wearing Flip-Flops are bad for your feet

Flip-flops go hand in hand with summer time and warm weather. You can slip them on and keep your feet cooler for the whole summer. One might find though that after consistently wearing them they experience pain in their feet and lower limbs. This is because flip-flops are not very good for your feet.

Recent studies claim that continuous use of flip-flops can cause permanent damage to your feet later on in life. Wearing flip-flops changes the biomechanics of your feet. When you wear them, it forces you to scrunch your toes together and rock in an awkward side to side motion, starting with your heel and moving to the outside of your foot to your toes. Due to your feet being the base of the weight of your body, this can cause much more severe damage than you think. The first signs of damage come from pain in the shin or heel area.

Flip-flops affect all areas of your feet starting with:

  • Toes – When there is only one strap to hold your feet in place, they tend to use the muscles more and could cause cases of tendinitis.
  • Bones – Wearing flip-flops too often can lead to stress fractures in the bones of your feet which develop from continuous trauma without shock absorption or cushioning.
  • Bacteria – One pair of flip-flops can have as much as 18,000 different kinds of bacteria.
  • Ankles – While wearing them you take shorter steps and touch your heels to the ground with less vertical force, which can throw off your natural gait and can trigger pain throughout the body. Changes to your natural gait can lead to issues including your ankles, hips, knees and back.

If you’re a fan of wearing flip-flops and are starting to experience foot pain or think you will, then it is time for the proper Foot Care. Your feet are the base of your body and should be taken care of with the utmost importance.

For more information, or to book an assessment, please contact Ontario Foot and Orthotics at one of our two locations: 519-623-3000 (Cambridge), 905-878-6479 (Milton). Or visit us online at

What can I do about fungus on my toenails?

One of the most common concerns amongst people when it comes to their feet are the changes that occur on their toenails. One might get concerned when they notice discoloration, thickening, or crumbling of their toenails. Sometimes one can experience all three events occurring at the same time. What causes these changes and why?

One of the main causes of change of the toenails is a fungal infection, also known as onchomycosis. This is an infection of the nails caused by a fungus. Fungi can live on nails, dead tissues of the hair, and outer skin layers. Fungal nails are more common in adults and in most cases follow fungal infections of the skin. How does one contract fungus in the nails? There are a number of ways this can occur. The fungi that cause infection thrive in moist, dark environments. These include public showers, swimming pools, gyms, and other areas where people sweat a lot. Those who use these facilities regularly are at a higher risk of contracting the fungi. Other things that can increase the risk of a fungal infection include getting manicures and pedicures where the tools used are not sterilized correctly, having moist skin for a long time, wearing closed-toe footwear, compromised immune system, and having a nail deformity or nail disease.

There are many preventative measures one can take to reduce the risk of contracting a fungal infection. These include:

  • Keeping the feet clean and dry on a daily basis.
  • Avoiding pedicures at places that do not sterilize their tools properly.
  • Wearing water shoes or sandals on a pool deck when not in the pool and when using public facilities such as showers, baths, etc.
  • Changing socks on a daily basis.
  • Airing out shoes using a deodorizer to help kill any fungal spores that may live in the shoe.

If you do have a fungal nail infection there are a variety of treatment options available. These treatment options range from topical and oral antifungal medication to laser treatment that is now available to help remove fungus from the nails. These treatment options to take time so please note you will not see immediate results. You must adhere to your treatment plan and should see an improvement within 3-6 months depending on the treatment option.

For more information, or to book an assessment, please contact Ontario Foot and Orthotics at one of our two locations: 519-623-3000 (Cambridge), 905-878-6479 (Milton). Or visit us online at

Ankle Sprains: How they can occur and the different treatment options

Ankle sprains are on the most common injuries of the foot. They can happen at any time to anyone from athletes to adults and children. A sprain can occur when you are participating in a sport or physical activity, or even if you step on an uneven surface, or step down on an awkward angle.

An ankle sprain can be very painful and uncomfortable. I have sprained my ankle on numerous occasions from various sports injuries to stepping on an uneven surface. Luckily for me, all my sprains were minor and required conservative treatment that I could do at home along with some physiotherapy.

The ankle has many ligaments that help hold the bones and joints in position. They are in place to help prevent the ankle from any abnormal positions like twisting or rolling of the foot. Ligaments are like an elastic band; they can stretch within their limits then go back to their original shape. Once the ligament is stretched beyond its means, a sprain can occur. The most severe sprain occurs once the ligament(s) has torn. This brings us to the different types of ankle sprains that can occur.

The two main types of ankle sprains are eversion and inversion sprains. An eversion sprain is more rare and occurs when the ankle rolls too far inwards. This can be accompanied by a fracture of the fibula. The deltoid ligament is one of the strongest ligaments of the ankle making it harder to sprain. That’s why this type of sprain is often rare and is usually a result of a break or fracture of the fibula.

The most common type of ankle sprain is an inversion sprain. This occurs when the ankle rolls too far outwards injuring the ligaments on the outside of the ankle. The two main ligaments that can be injured here are the ATFL (anterior talofibular ligament) and the CFL (calcaneal fibular ligament).

Once you get an ankle sprain it is important to get it checked to make sure it’s not too serious. Once you visit your doctor or foot specialist, there are a few tests that can be done to determine the degree of injury. An x-ray is sometimes done to determine if there is a break or fracture of the bone. There are three grades of a sprain. Grade 1 is a mild sprain, grade 2 is a moderate sprain, and grade 3 is a severe sprain that usually involves a break.

For grade 1 and 2 sprains the practitioner will probably notice tenderness and swelling at the site of injury. This is usually accompanied by bruising. You may also have limited range of motion of the ankle and should not try to force it in any one position. With a grade 1 or 2 sprain there will be a microscopic tear to partial tears of the fibers of the ligaments. With a grade 3 sprain you will most likely have a complete tear or rupture of the ligament.

There are a number of treatment options available for each type of sprain. Here are a few for each grade of sprain:

Grade 1 Sprain

  • RICE (Rest, Ice, Compression, Elevation). Make sure you rest and only weight bear as tolerated. Ice the area daily until the swelling comes down. You can use a tensor band to aid with compression and lastly elevate the ankle to help reduce swelling and inflammation.
  • Full range of motion stretching and strengthening exercises as tolerated.
  • Do not immobilize the foot by casting or splinting, as this won’t allow for any stretching exercises.

Grade 2 Sprains

  • Immobilize foot with an air cast or splint to prevent further injury of the ligaments.
  • Physical therapy with stretching and icing exercises as well as strengthening exercises.

Grade 3 Sprains

  • Immobilization of the foot.
  • Physical therapy similar to a grade 2 sprain but for a longer period of time.
  • Surgical intervention if necessary.

Ankle sprains can happen at any given moment so it is always important to be aware of your surroundings and to wear proper footwear to help stabilize and support the foot. If you do sprain your ankle it is very important to get it checked out to determine the extent of the sprain and the appropriate treatment option necessary.

For more information, or to book an assessment, please contact Ontario Foot and Orthotics at one of our two locations: 519-623-3000 (Cambridge), 905-878-6479 (Milton). Or visit us online at

My Body Changed When I was Pregnant, Especially my Feet!

During pregnancy, there are many changes that occur in the body. The one change that most women don’t realize is the change that occurs in their feet. Some of the main changes you may notice are swelling of the feet, flat feet, and pain in the arch and heel.

During my pregnancy I noticed that my feet started to look like they were getting flatter and I started to develop pain in my heels. This pain started to occur in my second trimester when most of the weight gain tends to happen. I had a hard time fitting in to some of my shoes and it felt like my feet had gotten bigger. Let’s discuss why these changes occur and ways we can manage the pain and discomfort.

Swelling (Edema)

We will start with swelling of the feet. Swelling, also known as edema, occurs when excess fluid collects in your tissues. A certain amount of swelling during pregnancy is normal because you are retaining more water. During pregnancy there is an increase in blood volume that helps you to carry extra oxygen and nutrients to your baby. Pregnancy hormones cause changes in blood vessels that can result in swelling. Gravity pulls all of the extra fluid down to your feet and ankles, causing the swelling.

Here are some tips that can help reduce swelling. Many of them worked for me!

  • Keep your feet elevated as much as possible. If you are working, place a stool under your desk to help elevate the feet.
  • Stretch your legs frequently if you are sitting for long periods of time. Make sure you stretch before walking or participating in any form of exercise.
  • Wear comfortable shoes that allow for stretching.
  • Do not wear socks or stockings that have a tight ring around the calves or ankles.
  • Wear compressing socks or stockings to help keep the circulation going and to prevent pooling of blood.
  • Drink plenty of water.
  • Exercise regularly.

Flat feet and plantar fasciitis

Flat feet occur because during pregnancy there is an increase in hormones in your body. One of these hormones is called relaxin and it does just that, relaxes the ligaments in the body including the feet. Relaxation of the ligaments plus weight gain contributes to collapse of the arches causing flat feet. When this occurs you may end up having to go up half a shoe size and unfortunately this does not change post pregnancy.

When I noticed my arches starting to collapse, I made sure that I wore good supportive footwear. I also tried to avoid walking barefoot to help reduce pressure on the joints of my feet. I have hard wood floors and ceramic tile throughout my house so I always made sure I was wearing supportive sandals in the house, which helped prevent foot pain. This also helps prevent plantar fasciitis, or heel pain. Plantar fasciitis occurs when the plantar fascia is overstretched causing pain at the insertion point in the heel. When the arches collapse, they put a lot of strain on the plantar fascia, which can lead to inflammation of the fascia causing heel pain. Stretching and icing exercises can also help reduce heel pain.

These are the main changes that occur in the feet during pregnancy. Not all pregnant women experience these changes, however most will experience at least on of these changes. The changes can be mild or can be severe causing an increased amount of pain and discomfort. By following these tips on prevention and treatment of these symptoms, you can manage your pain level and still enjoy a happy and healthy pregnancy!

As the owner of, and a chiropodist (foot specialist) at, Ontario Foot and Orthotics, I welcome any of your questions or concerns. For more information, or to book an assessment, please contact Ontario Foot and Orthotics at one of our two locations: 519-623-3000 (Cambridge), 905-878-6479 (Milton). Or visit us online at

Running The Distances

Do you like to run? Run for stress relief, health benefits, or the challenge? Signed up for a race?

Running is an excellent form of cardiovascular exercise, but it can put a great deal of repetitive stress on your body; on your bones, muscles, tendons and ligaments; on your knees, hips, lower back, and of course, your feet!

Whether you are new to running, returning from injury, making a long awaited comeback, or a seasoned runner, there are a number of things to keep in mind when it comes to your training and keeping yourself on the road:

Training errors (eg: too much too soon)

It is very easy to increase the mileage too much in a short period of time. Or to run all your training runs at the same or a high intensity. Remember the 10% rule when it comes to building up the mileage (increase training by no more than 10% each week), mix up you training runs throughout the week (you don’t have to run them all at the same pace), and alternate the routes so they are not all up hills or on the same pavements each time.

Poor fitting or worn running shoes

There’s great debate on how often you should replace your running shoes (or after X amount of kilometres), and lot of it comes down to how often and far you are running. Remember that with regular use, all those miles you are pounding the pavement with, will slowly wear out and break down the materials in the running shoes, that give you all that great support and cushioning.
Have a look at what you are wearing at the moment. Check to see how worn the soles are, how much of the tread has been worn away?
Are your feet starting to feel less comfortable in the shoes or have any new aches or pains started to develop?
Maybe it’s time to head down to your local specialised running store for a proper fitting and a fresh pair of shoes! One piece of advice I give all my patients is that you want to be walking out of that store with the most comfortable pair of shoes, even if that means trying on half a dozen pairs to get it right!

Biomechanical stresses / imbalances

When external factors such as training errors and footwear have been addressed, and there’s still a problem, then maybe it’s your biomechanics (how your body is structured and functions).
Excessive pronation (rolling in), pesplanus (flat feet), pescavus (high arches) and ligamentous laxity (hypermobile or flexible ligaments) are just some biomechanical factors that can create imbalances or extra stresses on our feet and lower limbs. And when you run, you put up to 4 times the stress through your body and joints, so it’s understandable that sometimes it can become too much!
Common running injuries that can occur include: achilles tendonitis, plantar fasciitis / heel pain, patellofemoralpain syndrome “runner’s knee”, iliotibial band (ITB) syndrome, stress fractures, bursitis, sesamoiditis, medial tibial stress syndrome “shin splits”, just to name a few.
In my personal experience, I have been running on and off for many years, but in the past 7 years I have increased my running from 5km races up to now training for my 2nd full marathon (42.2km) this October! I developed knee pain (patellofemoral pain syndrome) whilst training many years ago and it was my biomechanics that were a major contributor to the injury. I had Custom Foot Orthotics made for me to wear both day to day, and when exercising, to help improve my alignment, as part of a comprehensive treatment plan.
Orthotics are certainly something that have helped me, but every foot is different, so not everyone requires them, and having an assessment done by a qualified health professional is by far the best way to establish what is going wrong, what may be causing the issue (quite often multiple factors) and the best path of treatment.

If you do require Custom Foot Orthotics to help treat a sports injury, here are a few of tips I recommend:

  • Gradual wear in period – get used to wearing them in your day to day shoes (adding an extra hour each day over a 1-2 week period), before even considering wearing them running/exercising;
  • When buying new shoes (regular or running shoes) always bring your orthotics with you for the fitting, and mention to the staff member assisting with your shoe fitting that you wear them, as this can alter the amount of support/correction you will need from the shoes;
  • If you notice any squeaking of the orthotics when walking/running, I have found Body Glide to work well at eliminating this!

If you are experiencing any lingering aches and pains, or injuries that just won’t resolve, it may be worth a visit to your local Chiropodist/Foot Specialist. At Ontario Foot and Orthotics we provide lower limb biomechanical assessments to ensure the right path of treatment is established.
Treatment options available at Ontario Foot and Orthotics for lower limb sports injuries include but are not limited to; Custom Foot Orthotics (to help correct alignment issues and redistribute plantar pressures), MedXLaser Therapy (to promote healing, and reduce inflammation/pain), plus footwear and training advice.

For more information, or to book an assessment, contact us at one of our two locations: 519-623-3000 (Cambridge), 905-878-6479 (Milton). Or visit us at

Written By Kirsty Millwood B.Pod
Chiropodist/Foot Specialist

Why Footcare for Seniors is So Important in Milton and Cambridge

Feet are your foundation, no matter what your age.  When it comes to the health of seniors, a lot of attention is on mental, cardiovascular and immune health.  However, tending to the feet can be a really important way to promote comfort, mobility and dignity.

Your feet can also be the first sign that you have specific problems.  Diabetes and vascular disease, for instance, can lead to poor circulation, infections and poor healing of scrapes, cuts and bumps to your feet and lower legs.  Arthritis may also show first in the feet, as with gouty arthritis or rheumatoid arthritis.  Foot problems can also lead to changes in how you walk, potentially increasing your risk of falls.

Steps to foot health in seniors:

  • Pay attention –  Make sure to be aware of how your feet feel and look.  Are there any cuts/ulcers, ingrown toenails, blisters, persistent itching?  If these are present, make sure to inform your physician and chiropodist for proper care.
  • Make sure the shoes fit –  Improper shoe size can contribute to foot pain, blisters, calluses and bunions.  Try shoes on before purchasing them; walk in them to make sure they feel right.  The back of the shoe should not slide up and down when walking, avoid tight fitting shoes.  Low-heeled shoes are safer, provide more comfort and are less damaging than high-heeled shoes.  Select shoes with uppers that are soft and flexible.  Don’t forget about getting correctly fitted compression socks and hosiery. (Click here to read our post on selecting a good shoe).
  • Regular footcare –  Walking, stretching, foot massage and warm foot baths can all assist in the proper circulation to your feet.  Make sure to keep your feet dry before wearing shoes.
  • Watch for common problems –  Fungal infections, dry feet, bunions, corns and calluses, in-grown toenails, swollen feet, hammertoes, neuromas, bone spurs, etc.  Seek the care of a foot specialist, known as a chiropodist – they can help prevent, assess and treat problems affecting your feet.

For more information, or to book an assessment, contact us at one of our two locations: 519-623-3000 (Cambridge), 905-878-6479 (Milton).  Or visit us at

Benefits of MedX Laser Therapy in Foot Pain

Every decade or two, a new therapy comes to light that has a profound impact on treatment success.  In today’s health care setting, one of the most challenging and increasing components of treatment is pain management.  Pain can have a debilitating effect on the enjoyment of your day-to-day activities, your mood and energy overall.  Pain management has mostly been the realm of medications which often lead to undesired side effects.  However, there are new and effective options to not just reduce pain, but also to promote actual healing of damaged tissues in a way that does not carry unwanted side effects.

The MedX laser therapy device is the culmination of decades of medical research and certainly falls into the category of treatments that can have a transformative effect on improving patient care.  Studies by NASA researchers found that human tissues repair themselves up to 40% faster with the use of laser phototherapy.

Benefits of the MedX Laser:

  • Safe to use with no burning or unpleasant sensations
  • Reduces pain
  • Activates the healing process in your tissues
  • Penetrates your skin as deep as four inches to promote healing and pain relief
  • Decreases inflammation and swelling (edema)
  • Treatments take only 10-15 minutes

In the area of foot care, the MedX laser is appropriate to help in the treatment of many foot ailments: arthritis, Achilles tendonitis, plantar fasciitis, bursitis, sports injuries, wounds and ulcers, diabetic feet, bunions and many other acute and chronic conditions of the foot.

MedX Laser Therapy is a featured treatment option at Ontario Foot & Orthotics.  For more information, or to book an assessment, contact us at 905-878-6479 (Milton) Or visit us at

Milton Orthotics – Qualities Of A Good Shoe

There are many shoe manufacturers and many stores, particularly discount stores.  This has led to a large variety of shoes and also a large variety in the quality of the shoes.  Since the feet serve as the foundation of the structural support of your body, it is important to select quality shoes.  Below are some tips in selecting a good shoe.

What makes a good shoe?

  • Flexible in the right places – the front end of the sole must be soft and should flex to correspond to how your toes flex.  Two tips in selecting a good shoe is to make sure the front third of the shoe bends easily (not the rear two-thirds), and secondly, try to twist the shoe (holding the front and back parts of the shoe) by rotating your hands in opposite directions – a good shoe should not twist very much or very easily.
  • Room for the toes – in regular walking your toes naturally spread out.  Make sure when you try on a shoe, it has some ‘wiggle room’ for your toes.  This will prevent hard calluses from forming and reducing the chance of developing bunions and foot discomforts and pain overall.
  • Mind your arches – the shoe you purchase should either have an interchangeable inner sole, or you should purchase the shoe according to the type of arch you have.  There are three main categories of the arch:
  1. Neutral arch – these require firm midsoles and straight to semi-curved ‘lasts’ (‘last’ is the shape of the sole).
  2. Low-arch or ‘flat feet’ – select a shoe with a straight last and motion control to help stabilize your feet.
  3. High arch – get a shoe that provides cushioning to assist with shock absorption; a curved last also can help.

If you are still not sure and want professional advice on your feet and shoe selection, visit a chiropodist, your foot care specialist.

To arrange an assessment, contact us at one of our two locations: 519-623-3000 (Cambridge), 905-878-6479 (Milton).  Or visit us at